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Personalised ultrasound scan showing atherosclerosis helps patients reduce cardiovascular risk

A new randomized trial of over 3000 people has found that sharing pictorial representations of personalized scans showing the extent of atherosclerosis (vascular age and plaque in the arteries) to patients and their doctors results in a decreased risk of cardiovascular disease one year later, compared to people receiving usual information about their risk. (Näslund U et al. Visualization of asymptomatic atherosclerotic disease for optimum cardiovascular prevention (VIPVIZA): a pragmatic, open-label, randomised controlled trial. Lancet 2019; 393: 133 doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(18)32818-6

 

Smoking cessation, physical activity, statins, and antihypertensive medication to prevent cardiovascular disease are among the most evidence-based and cost-effective interventions in health care. However, low adherence to medication and lifestyle changes mean that these types of prevention efforts often fail.

Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in many countries, and despite a wealth of evidence about effective prevention methods from medication to lifestyle changes, adherence is low,” says Professor Ulf Näslund, Umea University Swweden. “Information alone rarely leads to behavior change and the recall of advice regarding exercise and diet is poorer than advice about medicines. Risk scores are widely used, but they might be too abstract, and therefore fail to stimulate appropriate behaviors. This trial shows the power of using personalized images of atherosclerosis as a tool to potentially prompt behavior change and reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease.” Of the participants in the Swedish Västerbotten County cardiovascular prevention programme, 3532  individuals were included in the study and underwent vascular ultrasound investigation of the carotid arteries. Half were randomly selected to receive the pictorial representation of carotid ultrasound, and half did not receive the pictorial information.

Participants aged 40 to 60 years with one or more cardiovascular risk factors were eligible to participate. All participants underwent blood sampling, a survey of clinical risk factors and ultrasound assessment for carotid intima media wall thickness and plaque formation.

Each person in the intervention group received a pictorial representation of plaque formation in their arteries, and a gauge ranging from green to red to illustrate their biological age compared with their chronological age. They then received a follow up call from a nurse after 2-4 weeks to answer any questions. The same pictorial presentation of the ultrasound result was also sent to their primary care doctor. Thus, the study had dual targets.

Both groups received information about their cardiovascular risk factors and a motivational health dialogue to promote healthier life style and, if needed according to clinical guidelines, pharmacological treatment.

At one year follow up, the cardiovascular risk score for all participants (3175 completed the follow up) was calculated showing differences between the two groups (Framingham Risk Score decreased in the intervention group but increased in the control group [-0.58 vs +0.35]; SCORE increased by twice as much in control group compared to the intervention group [0.27 vs 0.13]).

Improvements were also seen for total and LDL cholesterol in both groups, but the reduction was greater in the intervention group than in the control group. A graded effect was also noted, with the strongest effect seen for those with the worst results.

The differences at a population level were modest, but important, and the effect was largest among those at highest risk of cardiovascular disease, which is encouraging. Imaging technologies such as CT and MRI might allow for a more precise assessment of risk, but these technologies have a higher cost and are not available on an equitable basis for the entire population. Our approach integrated an ultrasound scan, and a follow up call with a nurse, into an already established screening programme, which means that our findings are highly relevant to clinical practice,” says Prof Näslund.

Importantly, the effect of the intervention did not differ by education level, suggesting that this type of risk communications might contribute to a reduction of the social gap in health. The findings come from a middle-aged population with low to moderate cardiovascular disease risk. Formal cost-effectiveness analyses will be done after 3-year follow-up.

Lancet 2019; 393: 133 doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(18)32818-6